Disciplinary hearings

Notable Disciplinary Hearings

Date published:

Notable Disciplinary Hearings

Practitioner 3 – October 2018
Practitioner 1 – November 2018
Practitioner 2 – November 2018
Practitioner 1 – December 2018
Practitioner 3 – December 2018

Practitioner 3 – October 2018

An electrical inspector was engaged to carry out an inspection of a new residential power connection. The inspector did not carry out the independent earth test or earth continuity test prior to livening the installation. Rather he relied on tests completed by the electrician. The inspector considered it was the electrician’s job to test and certify. He also believed he did not have to provide an electrical safety certificate for the connection of the consumer mains to the electricity supply within a pillar and that it was up to the electrician to request documentation.

The Board was concerned that the inspector was not aware of his duties and the role he plays in the risk-based certification system. An electrical inspector is not there to rubber stamp an electrical workers high risk prescribed electrical work. It is necessary that an inspector tests and verifies the safety of the prescribed electrical work they are engaged to inspect.

Practitioner 1 – November 2018

An electrician installed a photovoltaic system. A review of the prescribed electrical work following livening showed that bottom of each stand was not bonded, the DC isolator was in the ceiling space and not next to the inverter, metal conduit was not used where required and that wiring was left unprotected and lying on the roof. The electrical inspector who carried out an inspection of the high risk prescribed electrical work and who did not note the issues was previously disciplined by the Board. The case highlighted:

  • the need to work within an electrical worker’s personal competence; and
  • the importance of using the correct and relevant electrical standard for the prescribed electrical work being undertaken.

Electrical workers should note that all of the relevant electrical standards required to carry out prescribed electrical work are available free of charge through the Board’s website.

Practitioner 2 – November 2018

This was another case where the incorrect electrical standard was applied by the electrical worker. The prescribed electrical work involved installed submerged cabling at a marina. AS/NZS:3000 was applied. The applicable standard was AS/NZS 3004.1 Electrical installations – Marinas and boats.

Electrical workers should not presume that AS/NZS:3000 applies in all incidences. An assessment should be done prior to undertaking the work as to what the appropriate standard is. Checking the full list of electrical standards available on the Board’s website can be a good starting point.

Practitioner 1 – December 2018

An electrical appliance service person carried out prescribed electrical work that they were not authorised to do under that class of licence. The standard and compliance of the electrical work completed was such that it was evident that the electrical worker was working outside of their competence and authorisation.

Classes of licence differentiate what an electrical worker can and cannot do, otherwise known as their limits.  A specific class of licence is only issued after the recipient’s competence has been satisfactorily proven.  It is important that electrical workers are aware of their limits and that they comply with them, not only to ensure that they are not disciplined by the Board but to safeguard the public.

Details on what the limits of each licence class are can be found here.

Practitioner 3 – December 2018

The case involved a failure to supervise prescribed electrical work and allowing an unauthorised person to carry out prescribed electrical work. The electrical worker did not attend the premises to ascertain the full scope of work and any complicating factors, was not aware of an increase in scope, did not review the work or take any steps to ascertain how it was completed, did not test or ensure the required tests had been completed and did not review the CoC to which was issued under his name. He simply let two staff members, one of whom was a trainee, to carry out the work by themselves with no input from him. He did not supervise. Rather he relied on his knowledge of their past work and hoped for the best. The end result was that non-compliant and poor quality prescribed electrical work was completed in his name.

The Board deals with far too many cases involving a lack of supervision. Effective supervision is imperative to ensure safe and compliant prescribed electrical work is carried out and to assist trainees in their learning and development.

To assist electrical workers the Board has recently developed a Supervision Companion Guide. The Guide is designed to sit alongside the Board’s current Supervision Policies. It focuses on the key aspects of supervision and provides examples and tips for good supervision as well as a risk matrix that assists electrical workers to determine the level and type of supervision required for the prescribe electrical work being undertaken.

You can view the rules of the board here.